without a title

London.

Here’s what I told him when we sat in that basement bar the first night I saw him.

That I am only aware of my emotions and thoughts; I have no idea how they are formed. It’s a serious handicap of mine. It makes me seem inarticulate and illiterate. That my inability to convey an opinion in a way that would move the person reading it is what makes me inadequate. In more than one way. Unless I learn how to remove myself from my own mind, step outside of it, and take a wider look at the world around me, I am going to be trapped in the state of mind that I am in until the end of times.

Is this the reason why I haven’t been writing? Out of fear or disdain for everything that I produce. It’s always one or the other. But of course, it’s all just excuses. It’s hard work. It takes discipline. Grit. I am struggling with both.

You are too hard on yourself.

It has been six months, though, and it’s a disgrace to who I want to be.

december, xii.

The National Gallery, London. December 2017.

I keep certain songs on repeat. For weeks, months, years. Like my thoughts. Maybe if I change the music I listen to, so will my thoughts. A novel idea.

I flew to London for a weekend. To walk the streets, visit my favorite cafes, get lost in the streets of Marylebone. To laugh and be at ease for once. My world hasn’t been the same since.

We’ll always have Istanbul.

I am not alone this week and it disturbs my flow. No more visitors next year.

I’ll be home soon. I’m ready for the year’s end.

I agreed to a friendly dinner with the sunshine. He’s going to flip out when I tell him my stories. I am grateful that I can tell him to begin with.

I’ve decided to start working on my morning pages. To write lists again. I need to keep my mind still.

What he said to me. Everything replays as if on a loop in my head. But there’s nowhere to go from here.

I don’t know what you want me to say. The truth and nothing else.

Hong Kong grips at me. Three months. I’ve never been there on my own before, I’ve never been in the city without living there. I’m scared I won’t be strong enough against the gravity of memories.

collecting cities, winter

Vienna, Austria

Late November. The last morning in Vienna. My train for Slovakia leaves in ninety minutes and there is hardly any time to prepare coffee. I stumble around my friend’s flat (my namesake, anchor in the summer), waiting for her to get ready. Half asleep, I search for something in her room. But then.

7 am.
7 am.

I look up through a window and an incredible view shocks me into being wide-awake. The sky is blood red. Blood orange red. It is all the warm colors of this Earth. It is on fire. It is everything I need to be reminded of the beauty in this world. I am reminded of many things. That being half-asleep isn’t good enough. That one must look for beauty in life all the time, every day, every minute. That one shouldn’t be afraid of challenges. That one shouldn’t be afraid to live.

After that, I wasn’t anymore.

Hamburg, Germany

Early December. I get off the plane and straight onto the train. Ten or eleven stops to my destination. A cute boy sits across from me; we look at each other once in a while. A little smile in the corner of his mouth. He gets off the train before me. Adele’s Hello in my earphones. I have been listening to the song without a pause since she released it in October. Something is brewing inside me, I can feel it. I am about to make a sudden move. Hamburg is gray. Hamburg is always gray. There are different kinds of people around me here; different nationalities, languages, ethnicities. I feel more comfortable when a city’s population isn’t as homogenous as it is in Prague. It is, perhaps, the only reason I’ll end up leaving.

Red bricks. Hamburg.
Red bricks. Hamburg.

It is almost Christmas time and apart from summer, it’s the best period of the year to be in Hamburg. The Christmas markets are impressive. Loud, flashing lights. I eat my weight in sugar-roasted almonds. Mulled wine for lunch and then it just keeps flowing. It is dark early and exploring the wintry canals is tiring. I drink a lot of coffee in Hamburg. Even more wine.

The friend I am visiting holds a special place in my life despite the generational gap and many years apart. We spend the evenings at home, cooking Dalmatian dinners with a bottle of dry red. Solving puzzles with her kids. She’s animated and loud and never stops talking; she is exactly what I need in order to be ripped away from my thoughts. I feel at home.

Monday morning. I leave for the airport at five thirty, while everyone and everything still sleeps. It is close to 0*C Celcius. I walk through the darkness to the train station. Airport Express is almost empty. Somehow Hamburg becomes another city I call home. And so, in February, I return. And I am happy to be back.

London, United Kingdom

Late February. This particular London trip was three years in the making. In retrospect, London was the sudden move. Everyone I know here is a Hong Kong connection; it doesn’t surprise me. The girl I am staying with is from the same region as I am, but we still speak in English. I hang around Angel Station a lot; explore the area. There is a bar called Prague. A new photo series is born on that day, but I don’t know it yet. I drink coffee during the day; Hendrick’s at night. I am on edge during my entire stay. Never truly relaxed. London feels familiar. It is a city I was supposed to live in. At least, I think of it that way. For four days, I wonder whether this is where I will end up anyway.

London.
London.

On the second night, I pick up my friend at King’s Cross. We haven’t seen each other since an evening in Hong Kong at the Roadside Bar a few years ago. I still think of that night often. But now we are in London. It’s almost midnight and we devour the most delicious hot dog I’ve ever had – with onion and an abundance of toppings. For next to nothing. On the way home we pick up a bottle of rosé. I welcome the quietness of Hackney. Happy Man saw me on a Sunday; after the failed meet. There was irony in it, there was everything in it. It was the night I started drinking gin again.

One evening, I see a rasta musician at the Tottenham Court Road station singing a rendition of Pimpa’s Paradise. He looks like a Marley a little bit. I am taken aback by the song. I record a video of him and there is a moment when he looks straight at me. As if to say, this is for you. But I don’t want that song to be mine.

cities and coffee | london

My four days in London were about coffee.

I sampled a flat white at sixteen different coffee shops; so one could call that a devotion.
If I were living in London, these would be my go-to coffee spots.

Soho Grind. My favorite, probably.
Soho Grind. My favorite, probably.

Soho Radio
Soho Grind, yes!
Absolutely yes. Go there.

Department of Coffee and Social Affairs and nearby Prufrock
Monocle Cafe

Dept. of Coffee and Social Affairs
Dept. of Coffee and Social Affairs

Look Mum No Hands
Full Stop and Nude Espresso
Wild & Wood
Tom’s Kitchen

Monocle Cafe
Monocle Cafe

Coffeeworks Project
The Breakfast Club
Workshop Coffee
TOMS Coffee
Flat White

The Breakfast Club
The Breakfast Club

5 things | london, united kingdom

Monocle Cafe
Monocle Cafe

I spent four days in London and four days drinking coffee. Monocle Cafe was just one of the few I went to.

Sunny London. Yes, it's a real thing.
Sunny London. Yes, it’s a real thing.

Not a single drop of rain while I was there meant walking. Lots and lots of walking. Everything between Marylebone, Islington, Soho itself, Liverpool Street Station, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Chelsea, Hyde Park, Notting Hill, and Piccadilly Circus was my area. In other words, I covered an enormous piece of ground. There’s a restaurant, a coffee shop, or a fast food eatery on almost every corner. Also, pubs. Pubs everywhere. In London, I realized how much I love gin again and I enjoy it in a completely different way now. Because I mean, Hendrick’s with cucumber on ice? How much closer to heaven can I possibly get?

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Close to Piccadilly Circus.

After walking, the second best way to see London is to get on a bus and just ride around. Oyster card became my best friend only minutes after I landed. I also took a taxi, just for the sake of it. They’re cute and the driver was a nice guy full of stories and laughs.

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Blue. Big Ben.

Yeah, I know. See the Big Ben, right? Obviously. But seriously, once I got to the South Bank and looked at it from the other side (hello), I was impressed by its majestic beauty. Sitting there with a flat white, just watching people walk past; there was nothing else I wanted to do.

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The stuff dreams are made of.

London is classic. Vibrant, colorful, busy, and majestic. It’s a city I can get lost in and feel at home. It’s a city I will love returning to and perhaps, calling a home one day. Who knows.